EU ships leave Morocco as bilateral fisheries deal expires

 

 

A four-year fisheries agreement between Morocco and the European Union (EU) has expired on Saturday midnight GMT and as a result, the EU ships left the Moroccan waters.

Some 120 vessels from EU countries, including 90 vessels from Spain, have left the country as the two parties did not reach a new deal.

Morocco gets about 40 million euros (46.7 million U.S. dollars) every year for allowing the EU vessels to fish in its waters and since April 20, Morocco and the EU have been negotiating a new deal which did not yield posetive results.

 

AfDB injects $40m into agriculture development in Nigeria , others

 

 

The African Development Bank (AfDB) has injected an aggregate of $40 million seed fund into agriculture development projects in Nigeria, Ethiopia, Mali and 24 other countries. The development came under its Technology for African Agricultural Transformation (TAAT) initiative.

Adeniyi Adediran, the TAAT coordinator for Nigeria Livestock Compact gave the information at forum in Ibadan.

The fund, however, is to be distributed among 15 sub-projects with nine compacts and six enablers.

The livestock compact on poultry and small ruminants are already being undertaken in Ethiopia, Mali and Nigeria, where cassava skin is being converted to affordable livestock feed.

The projects, he said are being managed by key partners in Business Innovation Facility (BIF), UKAID and the Department for International Development (DfID).

Tunde Amole, the ILRI country representative, said at the meeting that the major focus in South West Nigeria under TAAT is to promote High Quality Cassava Peels (HQCP) mash for the livestock industry, adding that HQCP could be fortified and used to feed livestock especially poultry and pigs.

Federal government to complete all abandoned water projects

Dr Elijah Aderibigbe, the Director, Irrigation and Drainage, Federal Ministry of Water Resources, has assured that the Federal Government will complete all abandoned water projects in the country.Aderibigbe told the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) in Abuja on Friday that the step was necessary to see that previous investments in the sector would not be a waste.According to him, huge sums of money have been invested in some projects, as their completion will be beneficial to all Nigerians.He, however, noted that some projects had been phased out, as completing them would amount to economic waste, saying the present hectares in the country stood at 70,000.‘‘The present administration is continuing from where the previous administration stopped, this means that we are not embarking on any new project for now.‘‘We are actually looking at those projects that are near completion, we are looking at those ones that were abandoned and had reached advanced stages.‘‘We are revisiting them, the Federal Government is providing money.‘‘We have called the contractors back to site, so that the benefits will be enjoyed by all Nigerians, especially where the projects are sited.’’The director said schemes such as the Mamu-Akwa in Anambra and Sabke Irrigation project in Katsina State had been completed and handed over to the primary users through the river basins.He said efforts were ongoing to convert the schemes in two sources of energy and to also see that issues of sustainability when it comes to operation and maintenance were settled.According to Aderibigbe, the Shagari Irrigation project in Sokoto State is almost completed.He said that some projects that were abandoned since the time of Petroleum Trust Fund (PTF) were being resuscitated to see that Nigerians benefit from the water infrastructure.He commended the Federal Executive Council (FEC) for giving its blessings toward meeting the Revised Estimated Total Cost need for some abandoned projects through priority of attention.He said irrigated agriculture practice was fastbecoming an important sector in the economy.According to him, this is not surprising becausemost of the populace rely on agriculture and agro-related activities for their livelihoods.He, however, added that other benefits of irrigated agriculture include the value chain addition through marketing and transportation in food production.‘‘The benefits are enormous, even under a farmer, many would be employed when irrigated agriculture works,’’ he added.He urged Nigerians to take ownership of all water utilities, saying participatory irrigation concept would help to promote sustainability of projects.He director advised the Water Users Association to play a huge role in maintaining water facilities.

Science and Technology paramount in sustenance of food security in Africa – Experts

 

 

The use of science, technology and innovation could help promote the use of urban agriculture to sustain food and nutrition security in African cities, experts say.

The experts who specialise in agriculture, geography and urban planning say that urban agriculture has been neglected in urban planning and development agenda.

Agricultural activities such as crop farming and livestock keeping are deemed as activities of rural dwellers by African urbanites, according to the experts.

They explain that the continent needs to increase the adoption of modern technology and innovations in farming such as using agricultural data monitoring sensors that transmit timely data on amount of nutrients in the soil . Also rainfall and temperatures to mobile phone devices for action.

 

Nigeria Yam Export Programme targets huge earnings

 

 

The Nigerian Yam Export Programme has developed a four-year action plan aiming at earning $10 billion from exporting the product.

This was disclosed by the the National Coordinator, Technical Committee on Nigerian Yam Export Programme, Prof. Simon Irtwange, in Lagos.

He stated that the 2017 – 2020 plan aims at ensuring the improvement and development in all aspects of yam value chain.

He said ‘‘indeed, the government policy on yam export has come to stay; the only action now is how to improve on the process. The committee has developed Action/Work Plan (2017 – 2020) going forward.

The plan objective is to create an estimated one million jobs and earnings of at least 10 billion dollars annually in the next four years. The total cost required to operate the plan is N3.13 billion’’ .

Stakeholders call for standard weight, measure for farm produce

 

 

Stakeholders in the agriculture sector have called for standard weight and measure for rice, cassava and other produce, describing them as critical tools needed to grow the nation’s economy and agriculture value chain,

They made the call during a policy dialogue on standard weight and measure for cassava and rice value chains in Awka, Anambra state, South- East Nigeria .

The meeting was organised by the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD)-assisted Value Chain Development Programme (VCDP).

Mr. Ken Ukaoha, lead Consultant on Weights and Measure to IFAD-VCDP stated that standard weight and measure across the country would ensure that people had value for their money.

In his remarks, National Programme Coordinator of IFAD-VCDP, Mr. Amen Onoja appealed to the Anambra Government for support in ensuring total implementation and compliance.

On his part, Mr. Afam Mbanefo, the state Commissioner for Agriculture, Mechanisation, Processing and Export, said the state government is working to ensure that rice farmers comply with weight and measure regulation.

Also, the state Commissioner for Trade and Commerce, Mr. Christian Mmadubuko noted that standardisation would restore confidence and trust among farmers, traders and consumers.

AfDB to invest $120m to boost cassava production, others

 

 

The African Development Bank (AfDB) has said that it will invest $120 million between the next three years to boost the productivity of cassava and eight other commodities on the continent. The nine commodities are cassava, rice, maize, sorghum/millet, wheat, livestock, aquaculture, high iron beans and orange fleshed sweet potatoes.

According to Director for Agriculture, Dr. Martin Fregene who spoke at the fourth international conference on cassava, being organized by the Global Cassava Partnerships for the 21st Century, GCP21, in Cotonou, Benin Republic“Transforming cassava on the African continent would help African nations to cut imports and redirect about $1.2billion into African domestic economies” .

The cassava conference is being attended by more than 450 local and international partners in the cassava sector, coming from research and development organizations, government, farming community, and the private sector.

The bank’s investment in cassava comes at a time when African governments are scaling up efforts to end food imports and create wealth.

Fregene said cassava is a strategic crop for Africa’s food security and wealth creation for youth, and women, adding that “another dimension to the importance of cassava is in nutrition where cassava can enhance the nutrition of children directly or as feed for poultry and other livestock.”

With the largest volume of cassava coming from Africa, cassava supports more than 350 million people in Africa.

The Minister of Agriculture for the Republic of Benin, Dr. Gaston Dossouhoui said cassava remained the cheapest staple consumed by Africans, adding that “addressing the constraints of cassava production in Africa will have a positive impact on African farmers.”

He lauded AfDB President, Dr. Akinwumi Adesina for his commitment of investing in agriculture and cassava, in particular.

The minister also commended the GCP21 for organizing the cassava conference, emphasising that it would contribute to knowledge sharing that would help in removing the bottlenecks in the cassava sector.

Deputy Director-General for Partnerships for Delivery at the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Dr. Kenton Dashiell, said unlocking the potential of cassava required partnerships and close collaboration of partners to address the constraints facing cassava.

 

 

AfDB injects $40m into agriculture development in Nigeria , others

 

 

The African Development Bank (AfDB) has injected an aggregate of $40 million seed fund into agriculture development projects in Nigeria, Ethiopia, Mali and 24 other countries. The development came under its Technology for African Agricultural Transformation (TAAT) initiative.

Adeniyi Adediran, the TAAT coordinator for Nigeria Livestock Compact gave the information at forum in Ibadan.

The fund, however, is to be distributed among 15 sub-projects with nine compacts and six enablers.

The livestock compact on poultry and small ruminants are already being undertaken in Ethiopia, Mali and Nigeria, where cassava skin is being converted to affordable livestock feed.

The projects, he said are being managed by key partners in Business Innovation Facility (BIF), UKAID and the Department for International Development (DfID).

Tunde Amole, the ILRI country representative, said at the meeting that the major focus in South West Nigeria under TAAT is to promote High Quality Cassava Peels (HQCP) mash for the livestock industry, adding that HQCP could be fortified and used to feed livestock especially poultry and pigs.